MBFW RUSSIA 15 October, day 1

Day 1, 15th of October

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia
15th — 19th of October, 2019
 
Day 1, 15th of October

MUSIC SET | EIGHTEEN   yadi.sk/d/xmJunzywtQSq6A
MUSIC SET | Alexander Anatolyevich yadi.sk/d/_KJ6lsw09BxFDA
MUSIC SET | ASAMMUELL    yadi.sk/d/hXnYyRij1n73Iw
 
STREETSTYLE yadi.sk/d/gkv4D5DznOrb_w
BEHIND THE SCENES: yadi.sk/d/q2c_LvQahV0KPQ
GUESTS: yadi.sk/d/RdhjOngxrsSpdQ
 
POP-UP SHOP yadi.sk/d/AnTJirCtzxMtJQ
The first day of this fashion week, which marked a year when Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia invited a record number of foreign designers to their stage, was especially exciting. The day offered foreign and local press and fashion lovers no less than three shows by Global Talents Initiative winners, AWS [AFTER WORK STUDIO](Switzerland), CHAIN from Argentina and LITICHEVSKAYA of Germany. The three guest creators were accompanied on this day by grand shows from well-loved local brands, starting off with a collection of modern Russian fashion himself, Slava Zaitsev.
Visitors poured into the majestic hall of the Manezh building on the Red Square to feast their eyes on the fashion extravaganza taking place on the runways.
 
Special show Slava Zaitsev: ‘Moscow and Muscovites’
 
And what a great way to introduce our guests to the new fashion week — a retrospective love letter of sorts to Moscow and its inhabitants by Slava Zaitsev, known internationally as the maitre of Russian fashion.
A romantic presentation took place, introducing us to the love Zaitsev has for Russia’s capital. Major events from Moscow’s history unfolded before us, told in the form of a varied, yet classical collection. We started with the launch of the “New Look” fashion in the USSR by the actress Ludmila Gurchenko in a famed Soviet hit “The Carnival Night”, moved on to Gagarin’s trip to space (personified by rather rocket-like looks), remembered the futuristic Moscow Olympics of 1980 (shown here through the use of several athleisure garments in classic Soviet white-and-red) and finally took a gander at the construction of the Moscow-City business district (represented by several elegant and sleek outifts).
 
Overall, Zaitsev presented a very vibrant and varied collection — sarafans, sheer silks with wild and bright patterns accentuated every look. The use of wild jungle greens, reds and animal prints were a bold choice that Slava can afford easily.  Many of the patterns and colors reminded one of famed Pavlov Posad shawls but all had something special to say — leopard print was plentiful, and new look-style round hats and accessories fit these light yet powerful looks very well. We were shown an image of a true Muscovite beauty, opulent yet classical, understated yet wild.
 
The finale was especially touching, as Slava himself rose from the audience to thunderous applause. A standing ovation has shown that the appreciation of Slava’s talent is alive and well in the heart of Moscow.
These designers engaged participants of Moscow Longevity program to appear in their shows.
 
PHOTO: yadi.sk/d/Rc6Iaxh0bSI3LQ
 
BHSAD ‘Fashion Design’:
 
The famed Russian art and design school this year wanted to show us a gathering of young creatives exploring the most personal and intimate parts of their own creative psyche.
Calling the audience to view fashion as a pure art form, the young designers had just a year -  starting from scratch as students of fashion — to prepare their finalized collections.
Just a year brought incredible results from these young artists, and their collections were the proof in the pudding, as each of their honest, heartfelt interests and personalities shone through.
 
Vertigo (Lorin Mai)
 
Daria Bas
A collection filled with religious iconography, recalling the classic armor of Jeanne d’Arc and the Holy Mother. Vast, cloudlike shapes of deep, emerald velvet, somehow managed to keep their contextual form and remained fascinating and beautiful to see.The traditional shape of the gentleman’s suit from the early 80s was also played with and deconstructed.
 
ATTENTION ATTRACTION (Anastasia Zvonova)
A somewhat postapocalyptic offering from the young artist, a reflection upon the cultural utopia and human character. Thick, grey wool coats and garments, squared-off shapes and geometrical variety — a very powerful and beautiful collection from the young creator.
 
BUFFISTO (Anna Shmeleva)
Buff and twist make Buffisto, a structured offering very much in the vein of Phoebe Philo. A puffy sleeve there, a gathered tulle hem here and we have a start of something very unique. Both accentuating and freeing the female form, these light, white tulle numbers were a pleasure to watch, as they swayed with every light movement.
 
minimal (Irina Baulina)
Less is more as they say — minimalism as consumerist philosophy was on the mind of this designer. Anemone-like patterns, simple silhouettes and free, oversized cuts of rich coral.
 
 
I OF (Natalya Kosheleva)
A collection of practical menswear, coats, sweaters and trousers. It’s titled Defender, and it really shows — olive drab and dark grey materials. The heritage of World War II is especially important to the designer, so she tried to keep the collection as ecologically harmless as possible — most of the garments are one-of-a-kind and were made completely by hand from a multitude of patches and parts. Rubber boots, survival bags, and an overall connection of the historic (the Soviet army atmosphere) and modern (the method of production) made for a truly unique fashion experience.
 
Nomad tribe (Anna Bikchurova)
The mission of this brand is reviving the most ancient methods of garment production. Folksy and light, this sky-blue collection was colored completely using natural herbs and spices, which add longevity to the vividness of these luscious colors. “Less concept, more freedom” is this designer’s motto, so all garments can be worn inside-out as well. Creating a sense of psychological calm and comfort is important to the brand, so we saw mostly blues and whites, woolen kimono shapes and robes with golden and bronze patterns.
 
SCS Subconscious (Marina Gruzdova)
Patterned leggings covered with silk japanese obi-type coats, and tied off with puffy belt bags? Why not! The brand’s idea was to turn away from modern trends towards a more artistic, circus-like approach. French chic, glam rock and traditional japanese silhouettes all rolled into one, with added tulle palazzo pants, strapless dresses of blue and red and sexy catsuits of black-as-a-moonless-night-velvet.
 
U WAY (Inna Kuznetsova)
An exotic collection, very much inspired by the cyberpunk fiction and futuristic cities of China and Japan. Yet comfort was not left behind in the dust, since we saw duvet-like coats and metallic puffers and jackets. See-through plastic, iridescent bags, accessories that reminded the guests of Chinese New Year — bright draperies on the shoulders, bright red-and-gold trousers.
The latter part of the show was a more athleisure fare, with patterned tops and leggings making an appearance.
 
HANE (Natalia Vesnovskaya)
Hane means feather in Japanese, and this designer’s first collection was devoted to birds — knitwear and jackets were complemented with small, feathery fascinators, deep, bird-of-paradise colors were offset with accessories of grey and taupe, many patterns resembled bird feathers or reminded one of malachite. Eveningwear and outerwear comprised the majority of this collection, complete with little black dresses, sweaters and comfy, daily famourites.
 
[Mi:] (Maryam Kayikova)
This conceptual collection stepped straight from the folklore and practices of the designer’s native Kyrgyzstan, and created a fairy-tale-like feel. It’s as if we were present at some secret ceremony of a fairy tribe. The light fabrics fit well with lacquered leather, puffer coats and plastic, which the pastel fringes on many of the garments gave the whole thing a shamanistic aura.
Most parts of this collection — such as the wooden buttons — were created completely by hand.
Light pinks, yellows and blues made sure this magical collection stayed far above ground in its flamboyant designs.
 
KD (Kristina Dorovskaya)
These particular pieces were devoted to the Russian ideas of femininity, especially during the rule of the Romanov dynasty. Combining these opulent forms with fabrics mostly seen on new look jackets and dresses, this was a fascinating exploration of texture and shape.
Oversized dresses and coats with puffy sleeves reminded us of Elizabethan courtly dress.
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/Zu_y4_Zl0prOGQ
 
 
BHSAD BA (Hons) Fashion:
 
What followed was a result of another, three-year course at BHSAD, and showed the best graduates of the program. Over the last 11 years it has produced such acclaimed alumni as Jahnkoy.
 
Liliia Kosyreva (OPW, Office Performance Wear)
A collection of deconstructed office-wear, featuring headsets and cardboard ties as accessories. Trousers were promptly deconstructed into leggings, bold lettering was splattered all over white-grey-orange security style garments (some sporting puffed-up sleeves, very much William Klein’s Mr. Freedom).
A theatrical and wild assortment which would no doubt find its way into the heart of streetwear lovers.
 
Daria Norkina (The Magic of Oil)
Daria was born in Tyumen, and her Siberian roots really showed in this collection — a strange amalgam of Russian folk and industrial fashions. Simple white and folksy headscarves (“babushkas”) and neckerchiefs, accompanied by jackets and coats of blue leather, silk overcoats and tulle boots of white.
Beautiful patterns depicting Siberian folklore characters and stories — a true trip into the heart of modern Siberia.
 
Kseniya Kuleshova (KCH-O)
A deeply sociological look at the modern state of Russia, this was a chic and elegant collection of little black dresses and 80s business suits — most likely to show the social stratification and elitism prevalent in the modern Russian society. Many items were crafted well enough to be part of a Margiela collection, and accessories made of blonde hair tied up this sharp and dark collection.
 
Nensi Avetisian (Cellophane Paradox)
A commentary on today’s obsession with sustainable fashion and ethical consumption, this was a punky collection of garments of painted lurex and velvet, and wild play with silhouettes.
Many looks featured boxes or other rectangular shapes sewn into the fabric or comprising parts of the elaborate jackets.
 
Ira Druzhinina (Electric Getaways)
A collection inspired by the duality of modern man — the desire to return to the wild continuously wrestling with our transhumanist ideals. Around half of the materials are recycled and were sourced from eBay or Etsy.
A nomadic and beautiful collection of carpet-like fabrics covered with antique-looking Chinese patterns. These were accentuated with feathery acid-yellow tufts, patchwork, pink feathers and hemmed with faux-fur elements. Very eclectic and yet — it all fit together quite beautifully.
 
Diliara Abaturova-Galimova (Family DNA. Generational relationship.)
A deeply personal collection for the young designer, this was a streamlined black-and-white collection of garments with simple, lined patterns, almost clinical in its minimalism.
Black dresses and jackets were all outfitted with oversized zippers across the entire surface of the fabric, and finished off with a tremendous black gown of zippers, worn by a male model and sporting a full-face hood.
 
Dariya Tanygina (Steppe Ballad)
The steppes of Kazakhstan formed the ideas of this young designer, with the beauty of life in the wide-open spaces requiring clothing that should be both beautiful and practical. Simple cuts and laconic forms make up this collection, with repeating contours on oversize camisoles. A-shaped dresses that also reflect on the silhouette of the trousers and high collars that take their shape from the form of Kazakh yurts. The colors are specifically picked to be as neutral as possible, reminding us of the simplicity of creating garments mostly from wool.
 
Polina Starygina (Blessed Story)
A mystical and magical collection of gowns of nude and light-blue colors set off with silver and white elements.
Breaking social cliches and interpreting one’s own inner world through introspection was what inspired this collection. Delicate shaping of the shimmery silhouettes made the models very mermaid-like, while the corseting work reminded us of Tim Walker’s photography.
 
Valeriya Radchenko (Bohemium)
A dream-like concept project about a secret society obsessed with art. Yet the members of Bohemium are static and do not wish to change the world around them. It does change, however, through their passiveness.
A structured assembly of looks with copper-plated dresses and puffy grey jackets.
Exquisite metalwork was painstakingly assembled onto the garments, with models coming out in glittering copper chainmail and bronzed masques right out of Central Asia.
 
Sofya Tikhonova (Sinful Temptation)
The story of Eve’s exile from Eden through the tasting of the forbidden fruit comes alive in this collection. Rich on see-through plastic dresses and jackets, it completes itself with sheer nude materials.
Golden-cream and iridescent platinum combine to make a truly sinfully beautiful collection of evening wear. The structured corsets were exceptionally stunning.
 
Korinna Polynskaia  (Skazka)
Skazka means fairytale, and another fairytale is what we got this time. Each look telling a narrative of a journey from the tough, crowded and sometimes violent Moscow out to a fragile memory of a childhood village.
A strong collection of black, yellow and grey urbanwear giving over to coats and oversize trenches with high boots.
The trip to the fairytale village of old was complete with a model carrying a draped old-fashioned yoke (koromyslo) used for carrying well water buckets and familiar to anyone who ever visited an Eastern European village.
 
Maria Vaniushina (Hide and Seek)
Studying how a body relates to the space around it, the designer engrossed herself into a true version of office space. Blending the garments with office surroundings, she produced a geometrical and abstract collection utilizing splatters of red, black, green and white.
Shaping was achieved with large padding pieces, while many of the shapeless garments reminded us of Lady Gaga’s Comme des Garçons shapeless dress-on-a-dress.
Many models sported window blinds, painted with the same textures.
 
Anastasia Vaniushina (Swallowed by the Sofa)
Exploring clutter, hedonism, hoarding, laziness and the mundane, reliving the morning-after-the-party — that was the course for the final show of this program.
A collection of shimmery patterned dresses or Lolita-style gowns of baby pink, lovingly sewn with passion-red flower patterns.
Feminine and soft, this collection was a perfect dessert for such a smorgasbord of looks as we got today from the students at BHSAD.
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/oUtc3E_GB8pu3Q
 
GLOBAL TALENTS: AWS [AFTER WORK STUDIO] (Switzerland)
 
AWS [AFTER WORK STUDIO] stands for fashion that [does not have] to be seasonal in the classical sense. Driven by their aesthetic belief of combining feminine elegance with both sporty and classical elements with a focus on functionality, AWS develop collections which are usually smaller series of garments that result in a kind of continuous collection, with a focus on sustainability and local production. The fashion designer Karin Wüthrich and the graphic designer Matthias Fürst co-founded the brand 2016.
 
This time they gave us a free and varied collection of wool, skiwear and mini-jackets in orange, all accentuated with black straps and ribbons. The designers found a wonderful overall tone of deep, wooly black and coral tones, yet accomplishing it all with the elegance of the latest Dior collections.
One could easily see NYC influencer girls wear these small tops for Summer 2020, accompanied by this collection’s sandals and jackets of rich violet and coral.
Finishing it all off were some teeny-tiny dresses, tied up with signature black ribbons, and skirts of an almost-prawn color, all very lively and vivid. A beautiful assortment of looks for the street-savvy girls.
glo brand, supporting Global Talents.
 
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/uCQnF1_DyswJJQ
 
KSENIA GERTS
 
The Ural region became a launching pad for a young designer Ksenia Gerts where she got a degree and presented her first collection.
This time she gave us a moody collection, showing patterned shirts and trenches of black, white and grey, which bold geometric prints.
Puffy hoodies and semi-capes made this offering a great choice for any techwear or goth afficionado. Dusty-pink coats tied off with black belts ot light-grey raincoats, techwear harnesses tying them together, accompanied by simple yet elegant neckerchiefs.
Straight-pant trousers and puffy black vests created a feeling that here was a collection for an urban kid who dreams of becoming a guerilla.
 
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/gks4ZSZ4bSaZNA
 
GLOBAL TALENTS: CHAIN (Argentina)
 
CHAIN is a sustainable brand based in Buenos Aires (Argentina). The axis of the brand is the consolidation of a national identity. Each concept speaks about EARTH becoming HOME AND SHELTER. CHAIN only uses pure and raw cotton, carefully utilizing the natural fiber resources of their homeland.
Barefoot and meditative, the models walked on the runway dressed in garments made of thick, comfy fabrics.
Sandy and earthy tones were gently sprayed with light green as if moss was beginning to sprout on soil after a warm rain. It’s as if the men on the runway were some otherworldly gardeners, slowly moving around with their handbags that resembled gardening supply boxes.
The shirts and trousers were of the finest white cotton while the jackets were made of the lightest shade of denim. An airy and new-agey collection this was, the garments slowly turning gentle shades of pink. Wooly pullovers were accompanied by the exquisite cut of trousers. Male and female models slowly stepped out in what could very well be worn to bed or to a holiday in the mountains — cozy wide knit sweaters and even aprons, colored with a light lemon paint for men, dark grey jumpsuits for women. An elegy in watercolour — a wonderfully chill yet scrumptious offering from the Argentinian brand.
glo brand, supporting Global Talents.
 
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/jwhNICfgCp12vQ

Speranza Couture by NADEZHDA YUSUPOVA
The new collection by Nadezhda Yusupova was called Love Me, which was reflected in every look of the Spring-Summer show.
Speranza Couture by NADEZHDA YUSUPOVA features a glamorous mystery, full of  enchanted colors, transparent fabrics, and abundant decorations – sophisticated handmade embroidery and large bows, key elements of every look. The designer doesn’t count on minimalism expected to be popular next season. On the contrary, every look bedazzles with complexity and magnificence of implementation. While pure white is traditionally  believed to be the best color for a wedding collection, Nadezhda isn’t afraid to experiment and use diverse hues from pink and blue to turquoise and even black. The designer also had regard to the trend for balloon sleeves, which she laconically combined with slim feminine silhouettes. Especially remarkable was the final wedding dress: snow-white in color, with voluminous skirt, balloon sleeves and accentuated waist kind of played a final accord in the sequence of looks created by Speranza Couture by NADEZHDA YUSUPOVA.
PHOTO: yadi.sk/d/8loGlVbQJQgp2w
GLOBAL TALENTS: LITICHEVSKAYA (Germany)
 
LITICHEVSKAYA is a unisex label from Berlin, which works at the intersection of art and fashion, taking inspiration from Russian avant-garde, Perestroika culture and Soviet space exploration. The collections are dominated by geometric forms from the Russian avant-garde and Perestroika culture with symbols of revolution and slogans featuring elements such as 80s cuts, application and prints.
 
A bold collection of red, blue and army beige, inspired by constructivism and avantgardism with sputnik satellite patterns on the shirts for boys and Malevich and Rodchenko shapes for the girls. Jumpsuits and army overalls as well as dainty army trenchcoats of beige were accentuated by bronze metallic patches on the biceps or knees
Army-orange dresses sported blue and yellow sputnik shapes and most importantly — it all felt authentic, as if created in USSR yesterday, clean, idealist and retro-futuristic.
One could almost see someone like the poet Mayakovsky (who had a flair for wide-brimmed yellow hats) wearing one of these numbers.
An energetic and powerful assortment of sports and urbanwear.
glo brand, supporting Global Talents.
 
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/LMziiJtdVyYvnQ

PRESENTATION | KAZÁKI
 DNA of this emerging conceptual brand that appeared at MBFW Russia is based on nonconformity and provocation, first of all intended to reveal true feelings and emotions. Leather was the main material used by the designers in their new collections. It was showcased in puffer jackets and trenches, as well as in accessories – like belts or bags.
Puffer jackets with colored lining, combined with utilitarian vests and practical jeans, rebellious trenches, slim-fit asymmetric zip jackets, masculine loose suits, bomber coats and sportive pants – all of these will be good in spring-summer as well as in fall-winter, which contributes to the brand’s diversity. However, the designers decided not to experiment with colors, opting for dark blue, red, white and black.
PHOTO: yadi.sk/d/6X-056aRfFXZ5A
ODOR
 
The brand ODOR has become somewhat of a legend recently, with its hedonist and romantic aesthetics.
The Atelier ODOR concept — is a concept of an Italian sartoria, when one who owns a piece of highest sartorial art understands the importance of acquitted investment.
 
This, however, was no lighthearted collection for hedonist.
Grim pictures from the terror of the trenches of the Great War filled the screens in front of the runway. Messages from never-delivered letters to loved ones from heroic soldiers who fell in France floated around solemnly.
The collection itself completed the picture — a cross of military honour and funeral dirges in passion and valor. A collection inspired and bolstered by the memories of two world wars, with olive drab military influences complemented by see thru tulle shirts and lace — very reminiscent of French dauphins.
 
All emblazoned with military ribbons of honor, crosses and medals of gold sewn masterfully into the sheer fabric.
Military kerchiefs were tied around models necks with golden buttons often seen on military parades.
An assortment of strict black shirts and jackets, which all seemed very masculine and strict — were accompanied by the tenderness of tulle and deconstructed bodices and corsets.
The female models wore mourning dresses of deep black, while many boys sported haircuts popular during the turn of the century, and long lacy sleeves on their sheer shirts and lordly silken robes.A revolution in lace? Or perhaps a collection that we will remember long after today? Either way, a beautiful and somber creation from ODOR.
 
PHOTO:yadi.sk/d/ZIvz4-jJjiH9ng
 

Julia Dilua 
The show by Julia Dilua Fashion House started with a truly fairy-tale introduction, and then Australian diva Peruquois appeared at the catwalk singing her Russian Soul. For smooth transition to the defile, the Gzhel Dance Theater performed a dance. Turning to the Russian national traditions, Julia materialized our folklore and colors in her clothing. Various fur coats, capes and minks seemed to have cast a spell at the audience. There were some untypical clothing pieces, too – bombers and cropped coats. Bright colors were softened by pastel hues, monochromic looks were attenuated with animal prints (the designer chose the leopard print to highlight the key points). Every look was completed with fur headwear – a kokoshnik or a hairband.
PHOTO: yadi.sk/d/M21RvZlR6-ZnGA
 
The title partner of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia is Mercedes-Benz.

MBFW Russia partners: Aizel.ru (Official Partner), glo (Official Partner), Mary Kay (Official Make-Up Artist), MONÉ PROFESSIONAL (Official Style Artist), DHL (Official Logistics Partner), Sardinia (Official Partner), Metropol (Official Hotel).
 
For more information, please, refer to:
Artefact Agency
E-mail: pressa@artefact.ru